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Message from Osama

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Osama vs Bush

After numerous rounds of "We don't even know if Osama is still alive" on TV, Osama himself decided to send George Bush a letter in his own handwriting to let him know he was still in the game. Bush opened the letter and it appeared to contain a single line of coded message:

VWVSO - 370HSSV-0773H

Bush was baffled, so he e-mailed it to Condo Lisa Rice. Condi and her aides had not a clue either, so they sent it to the FBI. No one could solve it at the FBI so it went to the CIA, then to the NASA. Eventually they asked Britain's MI-6 for help. Within a minute MI-6 cabled the White House with this reply:

"Tell the President he's holding the message upside down"...

Decoded Message...


 
HELLO-ASSHOLE - OSAMA

 

What is a code?

A code is a rule for converting a piece of information (for example, a letter, word, phrase, or gesture) into another - usually shortened or covert - form or representation (one sign into another sign), not necessarily of the same type. In communications and information processing, encoding is the process by which information from a source is converted into symbols to be communicated. Decoding is the reverse process, converting these code symbols back into information understandable by a receiver.

One reason for coding is to enable communication in places where ordinary plain language, spoken or written, is difficult or impossible. For example, semaphore, where the configuration of flags held by a signaler or the arms of a semaphore tower encodes parts of the message, typically individual letters and numbers. Another person standing a great distance away can interpret the flags and reproduce the words sent.

Codes in communication used for brevity:

A cable code replaces words (e.g., ship or invoice) with shorter words, allowing the same information to be sent with fewer characters, more quickly, and most important, less expensively.

Codes can be used for brevity. When telegraph messages were the state of the art in rapid long distance communication, elaborate systems of commercial codes that encoded complete phrases into single words. Code words were chosen for various reasons: length, pronounceability, etc. Meanings were chosen to fit perceived needs: commercial negotiations, military terms for military codes, diplomatic terms for diplomatic codes, any and all of the preceding for espionage codes.

Codebooks and codebook publishers proliferated, including one run as a front for the American Black Chamber run by Herbert Yardley between the First and Second World Wars. The purpose of most of these codes was to save on cable costs. The use of data coding for data compression predates the computer era; an early example is the telegraph Morse code where more-frequently used characters have shorter representations. Techniques such as Huffman coding are now used by computer-based algorithms to compress large data files into a more compact form for storage or transmission.

Character Encodings:

Probably the most widely known data communications code so far (aka character representation) in use today is ASCII. In one or another version, it is used by nearly all personal computers, terminals, printers, and other communication equipment. It represents 128 characters with seven-bit binary numbers. In ASCII a lowercase "a" is always 1100001, an uppercase "A" always 1000001, and so on. There are many other encodings, which represent each character by a byte (usually referred as code pages), integer code point (Unicode) or a byte sequence (UTF-8).

Genetic Code:

Biological organisms contain genetic material that is used to control their function and development. This is DNA which contains units named genes that can produce proteins through a code (genetic code) in which a series of triplets (codons) of four possible nucleotides are translated into one of twenty possible amino acids. A sequence of codons results in a corresponding sequence of amino acids that form a protein.

Other Codes:

  • There are codes using colors, like traffic lights, the color code employed to mark the nominal value of the electrical resistors or that of the trashcans devoted to specific types of garbage (paper, glass, biological, etc.)

  • In marketing, coupon codes can be used for a financial discount or rebate when purchasing a product from an internet retailer.

  • In military environments, specific sounds with the cornet are used for different uses: to mark some moments of the day, to command the infantry in the battlefield, etc.

  • Communication systems for sensory impairments, such as sign language for deaf people and Braille for blind people, are based on movement or tactile codes.

  • Musical scores are the most common way to encode music.

  • Specific games, as chess, have their own code systems to record the matches (chess notation).

Other examples of encoding include:

  • Encoding (in cognition) is a basic perceptual process of interpreting incoming stimuli; technically speaking, it is a complex, multi-stage process of converting relatively objective sensory input (e.g., light, sound) into subjectively meaningful experience.

  • A content format is a specific encoding format for converting a specific type of data to information.

  • Text encoding uses a markup language to tag the structure and other features of a text to facilitate processing by computers.

  • Neural encoding is the way in which information is represented in neurons.

  • Memory encoding is the process of converting sensations into memories.

  • Television encoding: NTSC, PAL and SECAM

Codes and Acronyms:

  • Acronyms and abbreviations can be considered codes, and in a sense all languages and writing systems are codes for human thought.

  • International Air Transport Association airport codes are three-letter codes used to designate airports and used for bag tags. Station codes are similarly used on railways, but are usually national, so the same code can be used for different stations if they are in different countries.

  • Occasionally a code word achieves an independent existence (and meaning) while the original equivalent phrase is forgotten or at least no longer has the precise meaning attributed to the code word.

What is a decode or Decoder?

A decoder is a device which does the reverse operation of an encoder, undoing the encoding so that the original information can be retrieved. The same method used to encode is usually just reversed in order to decode. It is a combinational circuit that converts binary information from n input lines to a maximum of 2n unique output lines.

In digital electronics, a decoder can take the form of a multiple-input, multiple-output logic circuit that converts coded inputs into coded outputs, where the input and output codes are different.

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